Author Archives: IESE Library

The Future of Manufacturing in Europe

(CC) The future of manufacturing in Europe/EurofoundThe pilot project The Future of Manufacturing in Europe is an explorative and future-oriented study. It explores the future adoption of some key game-changing technologies and how this adoption can be promoted, even regionally. The analysis of implications for working life focuses primarily on tasks and skills, not only at the white-collar, tertiary-education level, but also for blue-collar occupations, including a focus on challenges facing national and company apprenticeship systems.

The future orientation also includes quantitative estimates of the employment implications of the Paris Climate Agreement, of large increases in global tariffs and of radical automation. It also measures the return of previously offshored jobs to Europe. Other research examines how the deepening globalisation provides opportunities for small companies to engage in international supply chains.

Read the full report here.

When: the scientific secrets of perfect timing by Daniel H. Pink

WhenOverview:

“Brims with a surprising amount of insight and practical advice.” —The Wall Street Journal

Daniel H. Pink, the #1 bestselling author of Drive and To Sell Is Human, unlocks the scientific secrets to good timing to help you flourish at work, at school, and at home.

Everyone knows that timing is everything. But we don’t know much about timing itself. Our lives are a never-ending stream of “when” decisions: when to start a business, schedule a class, get serious about a person. Yet we make those decisions based on intuition and guesswork.

Timing, it’s often assumed, is an art. In When: The Scientific Secrets of Perfect Timing, Pink shows that timing is really a science.

Drawing on a rich trove of research from psychology, biology, and economics, Pink reveals how best to live, work, and succeed. How can we use the hidden patterns of the day to build the ideal schedule? Why do certain breaks dramatically improve student test scores? How can we turn a stumbling beginning into a fresh start? Why should we avoid going to the hospital in the afternoon? Why is singing in time with other people as good for you as exercise? And what is the ideal time to quit a job, switch careers, or get married?

In When, Pink distills cutting-edge research and data on timing and synthesizes them into a fascinating, readable narrative packed with irresistible stories and practical takeaways that give readers compelling insights into how we can live richer, more engaged lives.  The World in 2019 will build on three decades of publishing success: this will be the 33rd edition. It will look ahead to the Trump administration’s prospects with a new Congress, the reality of Brexit, elections in India, Indonesia, Nigeria and across Europe, tech disruptions from AI and China (could 2019 mark “peak Sillicon Valley”?), space travel 50 years after the Moon landing and culture 500 years after Leonardo da Vinci. Provided by publisher.

You can find this title at IESE’s Library catalog.

Saint George’s Day at the Library

(CC) m s/FreeimagesApril 23 is, at one and the same time, Saint George’s Day, World Book Day and the Fair of the Book and the Rose in Catalonia.

To mark the occasion, the Library has prepared a selection of interesting books which will be displayed in the entrance hall. Come along and you will be able to take some of these books on loan.

We also have some sweets (at the Library Desk) to make the day even more special.

Have a very pleasant Saint George’s Day!

The IESE Library Team

IMF World Economic Outlook – April 2019 Update

(CC) Global Panorama/IMF The IMF has recently released the latest World Economic Outlook (WEO), “Growth Slowdown, Precarious Recovery.”

After strong growth in 2017 and early 2018, global economic activity slowed notably in the second half of last year, reflecting a confluence of factors affecting major economies. China’s growth declined following a combination of needed regulatory tightening to rein in shadow banking and an increase in trade tensions with the United States. The euro area economy lost more momentum than expected as consumer and business confidence weakened and car production in Germany was disrupted by the introduction of new emission standards; investment dropped in Italy as sovereign spreads widened; and external demand, especially from emerging Asia, softened. Elsewhere, natural disasters hurt activity in Japan. Trade tensions increasingly took a toll on business confidence and, so, financial market sentiment worsened, with financial conditions tightening for vulnerable emerging markets in the spring of 2018 and then in advanced economies later in the year, weighing on global demand. Conditions have eased in 2019 as the US Federal Reserve signaled a more accommodative monetary policy stance and markets became more optimistic about a US–China trade deal, but they remain slightly more restrictive than in the fall.

Read the full report here.

The Middle East and North Africa Risks Landscape

(CC) Karsten Wentink/FlickrThe Middle East and North Africa Risks Landscape briefing paper comes at a time when technological and geopolitical forces are reshaping regional landscapes. The technological breakthroughs of the Fourth Industrial Revolution are bringing opportunity but also risk for those unprepared to adapt. At the same time, fractures between global stakeholders—including geo-economic tension—are adding another layer of risk for the region.

Because the Middle East and North Africa is home to more natural-resources dependant economies than skills-driven ones, and because the region houses existing political and societal divides, the impacts of technological and geopolitical disruptions may be more pronounced here than elsewhere.

Using data from the World Economic Forum’s Global Risks Perception Survey and the Forum’s Executive Opinion Survey, the paper takes a “glocal” perspective—assessing risk from the standpoint of global stakeholders and regional business leaders. In doing so, it offers an assessment of the way in which global risks and regional developments are coming together to form a complex risk environment.

Download the full text here.

All You Need to Know About the Global Bakery and Cereals

(CC) lazy fri13th/FlickrMarketLine has published the report “Global Bakery and Cereals”, which provides data on the global sector’s size, value and volume between 2014 and 2018, as well as forecasts to 2023.

The report includes size and segmentation data, textual and graphical analysis of market growth trends, leading companies and macroeconomic forecasts.

The profile also contains descriptions of the leading players (in this case: Grupo Bimbo S.A. de C.V.; Kellogg’s Company and, Mondelez International, Inc.) including key financial metrics and analysis of competitive pressures within the market, making use of the Five Forces analysis.

The fulltext of the report is available on the web to students, professors, research assistants and staff of the IESE community.

Science-Industry Knowledge Exchange

(CC) Flickr / Latvian Foreign MinistryCountries deploy a variety of financial, regulatory and soft policy instruments to promote science-industry knowledge exchange. While these instruments are often discussed in isolation, they are implemented collectively and may reinforce and complement but also weaken or even negatively affect each other and add excessive complexity. The paper “Science-industry knowledge exchange: A mapping of policy instruments and their interactions” develops a conceptual framework to map policy instruments for knowledge exchange and assess the interactions between them. The framework also considers how national contexts and global trends influence the choice of policy instruments. Policy examples drawn from the EC-OECD STIP Compass database and from case studies show that there are significant differences across countries in the relative importance given to each policy instrument in terms of budget, target groups, eligibility criteria, time horizon and implementation. These differences are also a consequence of different country conditions.

The whole paper is available for the IESE Community here.

Enlightenment now: the case for reason, science, humanism, and progress by Steven Pinker

Enlightenment nowOverview:

INSTANT NEW YORK TIMES BESTSELLER
A NEW YORK TIMES NOTABLE BOOK OF 2018
ONE OF THE ECONOMIST’S BOOKS OF THE YEAR

“My new favorite book of all time.” —Bill Gates

If you think the world is coming to an end, think again: people are living longer, healthier, freer, and happier lives, and while our problems are formidable, the solutions lie in the Enlightenment ideal of using reason and science.

Is the world really falling apart? Is the ideal of progress obsolete? In this elegant assessment of the human condition in the third millennium, cognitive scientist and public intellectual Steven Pinker urges us to step back from the gory headlines and prophecies of doom, which play to our psychological biases. Instead, follow the data: In seventy-five jaw-dropping graphs, Pinker shows that life, health, prosperity, safety, peace, knowledge, and happiness are on the rise, not just in the West, but worldwide. This progress is not the result of some cosmic force. It is a gift of the Enlightenment: the conviction that reason and science can enhance human flourishing.

Far from being a naïve hope, the Enlightenment, we now know, has worked. But more than ever, it needs a vigorous defense. The Enlightenment project swims against currents of human nature—tribalism, authoritarianism, demonization, magical thinking—which demagogues are all too willing to exploit. Many commentators, committed to political, religious, or romantic ideologies, fight a rearguard action against it. The result is a corrosive fatalism and a willingness to wreck the precious institutions of liberal democracy and global cooperation.

With intellectual depth and literary flair, Enlightenment Now makes the case for reason, science, and humanism: the ideals we need to confront our problems and continue our progress.  The World in 2019 will build on three decades of publishing success: this will be the 33rd edition. It will look ahead to the Trump administration’s prospects with a new Congress, the reality of Brexit, elections in India, Indonesia, Nigeria and across Europe, tech disruptions from AI and China (could 2019 mark “peak Sillicon Valley”?), space travel 50 years after the Moon landing and culture 500 years after Leonardo da Vinci. Provided by publisher.

You can find this title at IESE’s Library catalog.