Managing Supply Chains and Operations During Crises

Toilet paper rarely makes headlines. But perhaps no other commercial product save hand sanitizer has become as emblematic of the global anxieties caused by the coronavirus pandemic as toilet paper – or the lack thereof. Unlike hand sanitizer, however, most experts agree that the rush to hoard toilet paper stems from an illogical anxiety, one planted in the notion that the supply chain will suddenly break: that manufacturers will abruptly stop producing toilet paper and that supermarkets will be unable to stock… Read More

Global Industry: The Last Frontier of Digital Disruption

Digital disruption has unleashed numerous effects, upending global businesses and shortening company life cycles, particularly for organizations in the service and retail sectors. Light on assets, these firms are able to rapidly scale their operations by leveraging platform-based business models and new technologies to quickly train their workforce. But what about industry? Like all sectors, global manufacturers have felt the effects of technological change, geopolitical turbulence and evolving markets, shifts that have forced them to increase their agility and flexibility in order… Read More

Global Manufacturing, Disrupted: Coming Soon to a Factory Near You!

The topic of disruption has captured headlines in recent years with the explosion of new technologies, but for many business leaders, it has been a nagging concern for at least 20 years, when Clayton Christensen first coined the phrase in The Innovator’s Dilemma: When New Technologies Cause Great Firms to Fail. In his bestselling book, he describes how even the most consolidated companies can lose market share or even collapse when they fail to relinquish “tried-and-true” business practices and embrace innovation. Needless… Read More

Industry 4.0: Rev Your Engines

What is Industry 4.0 exactly? To better understand the fourth industrial revolution, let’s take look at the first three. Industry 1.0 took root in the mid-1770s, when factories began to harness steam engine power and replace manual labor with machines. The second industrial revolution – perhaps best epitomized by Henry Ford and his Model T assembly line –  started in 1914. In Industry 2.0, electricity began to power factories and standardized, interchangeable parts gave rise to a wave of rapid industrialization. The… Read More