Author Archives: IESE Library

Societal Change and Trust in Institutions

(CC) Societal Change and Trust in Institutions/Eurofound

As data from the European Quality of Life Surveys and Eurobarometer show, the sharp decline in trust in institutions was a temporary phenomenon during the recession. In some Member States, trust in the EU declined more during this period than trust in national governments, but trust in the EU has generally remained higher than trust in national governments in most countries. The report shows that moderating social tensions and feelings of social exclusion can help to stem the decline in trust. However, to boost trust in institutions, improving the quality of public services is the most powerful driver. A number of encouraging and practical consequences result from trust in public institutions: for example, countries with higher trust in political institutions have a lower level of tax evasion (VAT gap) and greater public support for policy reforms.

Read the full report here.

All You Need to Know About the Global Personal Hygiene

(CC) Marco Verch /FlickrMarketLine has published the report “Global Personal Hygiene”, which provides data on the global sector’s size, value and volume between 2013 and 2017, as well as forecasts to 2022.

The report includes size and segmentation data, textual and graphical analysis of market growth trends, leading companies and macroeconomic forecasts.

The profile also contains descriptions of the leading players (in this case: Beiersdorf AG, Colgate-Palmolive Company, The Procter & Gamble Co and, Unilever N.V.) including key financial metrics and analysis of competitive pressures within the market, making use of the Five Forces analysis.

The fulltext of the report is available on the web to students, professors, research assistants and staff of the IESE community.

The UN E-Government Survey report 2018

(CC) Denmark/cdnCountries in all regions of the world are continuing to make strides in their efforts to improve e-­government and to provide public services online according to the report launched by the United Nations Department of Economic and Social Affairs.

In a 2018 ranking of countries on e-­government development, Denmark, Australia, and Republic of Korea came out on top of a group of 40 countries, scoring very high on an index (the E-­Government Development Index—EGDI), which measures countries’ use of information and communications technologies to deliver public services. Spain places 17th.

The Index captures the scope and quality of online services, status of telecommunication infrastructure and existing human capacity. This year, more countries made the top tier of the index­­ index values in the range of 0.75 to 1.00—than in 2016 when there were 29 countries in that category.

These countries lead also respective regional ratings in Europe, Oceania and Asia. Mauritius is leading in Africa with a global rank of 66 and the United States in the Americas with a global rank of 11.

For more information about the ranking and related stories, go to the official website for the United Nations E-Government Survey 2018.

Our Shared Digital Future: Building an Inclusive, Trustworthy and Sustainable Digital Society

(CC) Our Shared Digital Future/WEFOur Shared Digital Future” is a publication shaped by leaders from business, government, academia and civil society who collectively acknowledge the need for shared goals and coordinated action to shape an inclusive, sustainable, digital future. Facilitated by the World Economy Forum’s System Initiative on Digital Economy and Society, the paper reviews current status, offers an illustrative list of ongoing initiatives at global and local levels, and identifies developments to watch in at least six shared goals around universal internet access and adoption, digital transformation, digital identity, governance, cyber resilience, and data. It calls on global leaders and organisations to strengthen cooperation and to evolve shared platforms for shaping our digital future.

The publication seeks to serve as a conversation starter, as the world celebrates the milestone of more than half of the world’s population now connected to the internet, and while less than half of those already online trust that technology will make their lives better.

Read the full report here.

Global Energy Perspective 2018

(CC) Energy/FreeimagesBased on McKinsey expertise, insights and tools, GEP represents the latest consensus on how the energy transition will unfold. The study takes into account both macro- and micro-economic developments and the model shows demand projections for 145 countries, 28 sectors, and 55 fuel types.

The report is available from the McKinsey website.

The value of everything: making and taking in the global economy by Mariana Mazzucato

The value of everythingOverview:

Modern economies reward activities that extract value rather than create it. This must change to ensure a capitalism that works for us all.

Shortlisted for the FT & McKinsey Business Book of the Year Award.

A scathing indictment of our current global financial system, The Value of Everything rigorously scrutinizes the way in which economic value has been accounted and reveals how economic theory has failed to clearly delineate the difference between value creation and value extraction. Mariana Mazzucato argues that the increasingly blurry distinction between the two categories has allowed certain actors in the economy to portray themselves as value creators, while in reality they are just moving around existing value or, even worse, destroying it.

The book uses case studies-from Silicon Valley to the financial sector to big pharma-to show how the foggy notions of value create confusion between rents and profits, reward extractors and creators, and distort the measurements of growth and GDP. In the process, innovation suffers and inequality rises.

The lesson here is urgent and sobering: to rescue our economy from the next inevitable crisis and to foster long-term economic growth, we will need to rethink capitalism, rethink the role of public policy and the importance of the public sector, and redefine how we measure value in our society. Provided by publisher.

You can find this title at IESE’s Library catalog.

All You Need to Know About the Global Electricity Retailing

(CC) NASA Goddard Space Flight Center/FlickrMarketLine has published the report “Global Electricity Retailing”, which provides data on the global sector’s size, value and volume between 2013 and 2017, as well as forecasts to 2022.

The report includes size and segmentation data, textual and graphical analysis of market growth trends, leading companies and macroeconomic forecasts.

The profile also contains descriptions of the leading players (in this case: China Guodian Corporation, Huadian Power International Corporation Limited, Korea Electric Power Corporation and, State Power Investment Corporation) including key financial metrics and analysis of competitive pressures within the market, making use of the Five Forces analysis.

The fulltext of the report is available on the web to students, professors, research assistants and staff of the IESE community.

Industries in 2019

(CC) Industries in 2019/EIUThe world’s major industries are all set for further growth in 2019, but there are some worrying risks. “Industries in 2019” examines examine the top five global risks affecting six key industry sectors: automotive, consumer goods and retail, energy, financial services, healthcare, and telecoms. The report analyses what to expect for 2019, focusing on how these challenges could impact our industry forecasts for the year ahead.

The report is available to download from the Economist Intelligence Unit website (pre-registration is required).

OECD Economic Survey of Spain 2018

(CC) Economic Survey of Spain 2018/OECDThe OECD has recedntly published the “Economic Survey of Spain 2018”.

According to the report, the Spanish economy continues its strong growth, thanks to past structural reforms, robust employment growth and accommodative macroeconomic policies. However, the legacy of the crisis has not yet been fully overcome and imbalances remain.

The robust recovery provides an opportunity to keep reducing macroeconomic and financial vulnerabilities, such as high public and external debt. The resilience of public finances should be increased to address medium-term challenges, including spending pressures from demographic changes. Income inequality is high and displays regional differences in Spain. More effective use of taxes and transfers, bringing people back into employment and reducing regional disparities would make growth more inclusive. Improving productivity growth, which remains subdued, will require firms to be more exposed to competition and innovation. Policies to improve education and skills will deliver results not only in terms of productivity growth, but also better employment prospects and wages. Spain is a highly decentralised country, making the effective implementation of national reforms dependent on regional policies. More effective coordination and cooperation across different levels of government are needed to improve the effectiveness of policies.

The full text is available for the IESE Community here.